Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent kind of dementia with roughly 135 million cases expected in the world by 2050. Unfortunately, current medications for the treatment of AD can only relieve symptoms but they do not act as disease-modifying agents that can stop the course of AD. Caffeine is one of the most widely used drugs in the world today, and a number of clinical studies suggest that drinking coffee may be good for health, especially in the fight against neurodegenerative conditions such as AD. Experimental works conducted "in vivo" and "in vitro" provide intriguing evidence that caffeine exerts its neuroprotective effects by antagonistically binding to A2A receptors (A2ARs), a subset of GPCRs that are triggered by the endogenous nucleoside adenosine. This review provides a summary of the scientific data supporting the critical role that A2ARs play in memory loss and cognitive decline, as well as the evidence supporting the protective benefits against neurodegeneration that may be attained by caffeine's antagonistic action on these receptors. They are a novel and fascinating target for regulating and enhancing synaptic activity, achieving symptomatic and potentially disease-modifying effects, and protecting against neurodegeneration.

Caffeine for Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease: Is the A2A Adenosine Receptor Its Target?

Stefania Merighi
;
Alessia Travagli;Manuela Nigro;Silvia Pasquini;Martina Cappello;Chiara Contri;Katia Varani;Fabrizio Vincenzi;Pier Andrea Borea;Stefania Gessi
2023

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent kind of dementia with roughly 135 million cases expected in the world by 2050. Unfortunately, current medications for the treatment of AD can only relieve symptoms but they do not act as disease-modifying agents that can stop the course of AD. Caffeine is one of the most widely used drugs in the world today, and a number of clinical studies suggest that drinking coffee may be good for health, especially in the fight against neurodegenerative conditions such as AD. Experimental works conducted "in vivo" and "in vitro" provide intriguing evidence that caffeine exerts its neuroprotective effects by antagonistically binding to A2A receptors (A2ARs), a subset of GPCRs that are triggered by the endogenous nucleoside adenosine. This review provides a summary of the scientific data supporting the critical role that A2ARs play in memory loss and cognitive decline, as well as the evidence supporting the protective benefits against neurodegeneration that may be attained by caffeine's antagonistic action on these receptors. They are a novel and fascinating target for regulating and enhancing synaptic activity, achieving symptomatic and potentially disease-modifying effects, and protecting against neurodegeneration.
2023
Merighi, Stefania; Travagli, Alessia; Nigro, Manuela; Pasquini, Silvia; Cappello, Martina; Contri, Chiara; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2544131
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