Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) are members of the Roseolovirus genus within the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. HHV-6 and HHV-7 primary infection occurs in early childhood and causes short febrile diseases, sometimes associated with cutaneous rash (exanthem subitum). Both HHV-6 and HHV-7 are highly prevalent in the healthy population, establish latency in macrophages and T-lymphocytes, are frequently shed in saliva of healthy donors, and the pathogenic potential of reactivated virus ranges from asymptomatic infection to severe diseases in transplant recipients. These features have contributed to the notion that HHV-6 and HHV-7 are more or less "harmless" viruses. Consequently, the medical and scientific interest originally prompted by their discovery has been gradually waning. The aim of this review is to provide a short update of the current knowledge on these viruses, and to suggest that the medical importance of Roseoloviruses should not be understimated.

Molecular biology and clinical associations of Roseoloviruses human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7.

CASELLI, Elisabetta
Primo
;
DI LUCA, Dario
Ultimo
2007

Abstract

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) are members of the Roseolovirus genus within the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. HHV-6 and HHV-7 primary infection occurs in early childhood and causes short febrile diseases, sometimes associated with cutaneous rash (exanthem subitum). Both HHV-6 and HHV-7 are highly prevalent in the healthy population, establish latency in macrophages and T-lymphocytes, are frequently shed in saliva of healthy donors, and the pathogenic potential of reactivated virus ranges from asymptomatic infection to severe diseases in transplant recipients. These features have contributed to the notion that HHV-6 and HHV-7 are more or less "harmless" viruses. Consequently, the medical and scientific interest originally prompted by their discovery has been gradually waning. The aim of this review is to provide a short update of the current knowledge on these viruses, and to suggest that the medical importance of Roseoloviruses should not be understimated.
2007
Caselli, Elisabetta; DI LUCA, Dario
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/470380
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