Objective: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the gold standard for most benign gallbladder diseases. Early discharge (<24 hours) has the same outcomes as longer (>24 hours) hospital stay. Nevertheless, the rate of delayed discharge >24 hours range from 4.6% to 37%. The primary endpoint of this Italian nationwide study is to analyze the prevalence of patients undergoing elective LC who experienced a delayed discharge >24 hours and identify potential limiting factors of early discharge. Results from these analyses will be used to select patients who can be safely discharged on the same day after surgery. Secondary endpoints will be to evaluate the patient's quality of life (QoL), assess the direct health costs associated with late discharge, and quantify the patient's involvement in the treatment process. Patients and methods: This prospective, observational study was conducted following a resident-led model and the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines. All patients were treated according to the local hospital protocol and received routine care as standard therapy. Results: We expected to obtain the enrollment of at least 500 patients based on an assumed difference in discharge delay between the reference and the recruitable population of 6% and the identification of factors related to discharge failure within 24 h. Early discharge after LC leads to advantages both in terms of clinical outcomes and quality of life of the patient, and it is highly effective in terms of health costs and shortening the waiting list. However, clinical reality differs from the results of randomized studies by a complex series of non-objectionable real-world data influencing treatment plans. Therefore, we expected to identify independent predictors and factors of failure of early discharge. Conclusions: Clinical reality often differs from randomized trial results. In Italy, the vast majority of delayed discharges after LC may not be related to surgery and can be prevented both with logistical reorganization and with a readjustment of the trust reimbursement policies.

Factors influencing delayed discharge after day-surgery laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the DeDiLaCo study protocol

Anania, G
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Fabbri, N
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Feo, CV
Membro del Collaboration Group
2023

Abstract

Objective: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the gold standard for most benign gallbladder diseases. Early discharge (<24 hours) has the same outcomes as longer (>24 hours) hospital stay. Nevertheless, the rate of delayed discharge >24 hours range from 4.6% to 37%. The primary endpoint of this Italian nationwide study is to analyze the prevalence of patients undergoing elective LC who experienced a delayed discharge >24 hours and identify potential limiting factors of early discharge. Results from these analyses will be used to select patients who can be safely discharged on the same day after surgery. Secondary endpoints will be to evaluate the patient's quality of life (QoL), assess the direct health costs associated with late discharge, and quantify the patient's involvement in the treatment process. Patients and methods: This prospective, observational study was conducted following a resident-led model and the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines. All patients were treated according to the local hospital protocol and received routine care as standard therapy. Results: We expected to obtain the enrollment of at least 500 patients based on an assumed difference in discharge delay between the reference and the recruitable population of 6% and the identification of factors related to discharge failure within 24 h. Early discharge after LC leads to advantages both in terms of clinical outcomes and quality of life of the patient, and it is highly effective in terms of health costs and shortening the waiting list. However, clinical reality differs from the results of randomized studies by a complex series of non-objectionable real-world data influencing treatment plans. Therefore, we expected to identify independent predictors and factors of failure of early discharge. Conclusions: Clinical reality often differs from randomized trial results. In Italy, the vast majority of delayed discharges after LC may not be related to surgery and can be prevented both with logistical reorganization and with a readjustment of the trust reimbursement policies.
2023
Cillara, N; Fransvea, P; Sechi, R; Cicalò, E; Sotgiu, G; Provenzano, M; Poillucci, G; Agnes, A; Podda, M.; THE DEDILACO COLLABORATIVE, Group; Anania, G; Fabbri, N; Feo, Cv
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2527010
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