Upper-limb paresis is common after stroke. An important tool to assess motor recovery is to use marker-based motion capture systems to measure the kinematic characteristics of patients’ movements in ecological scenarios. These systems are, however, very expensive and not readily available for many rehabilitation units. Here, we explored whether the markerless hand motion capabilities of the cost-effective Oculus Quest head-mounted display could be used to provide clinically meaningful measures. A total of 14 stroke patients executed ecologically relevant upper-limb tasks in an immersive virtual environment. During task execution, we recorded their hand movements simultaneously by means of the Oculus Quest’s and a marker-based motion capture system. Our results showed that the markerless estimates of the hand position and peak velocity provided by the Oculus Quest were in very close agreement with those provided by a marker-based commercial system with their regression line having a slope close to 1 (maximum distance: mean slope = 0.94 ± 0.1; peak velocity: mean slope = 1.06 ± 0.12). Furthermore, the Oculus Quest had virtually the same sensitivity as that of a commercial system in distinguishing healthy from pathological kinematic measures. The Oculus Quest was as accurate as a commercial marker-based system in measuring clinically meaningful upper-limb kinematic parameters in stroke patients.

Quantitative Comparison of Hand Kinematics Measured with a Markerless Commercial Head-Mounted Display and a Marker-Based Motion Capture System in Stroke Survivors

Casile A.
Primo
;
Fregna G.
Secondo
;
Manfredini F.
;
Lamberti N.;Baroni A.
Penultimo
;
Straudi S.
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Upper-limb paresis is common after stroke. An important tool to assess motor recovery is to use marker-based motion capture systems to measure the kinematic characteristics of patients’ movements in ecological scenarios. These systems are, however, very expensive and not readily available for many rehabilitation units. Here, we explored whether the markerless hand motion capabilities of the cost-effective Oculus Quest head-mounted display could be used to provide clinically meaningful measures. A total of 14 stroke patients executed ecologically relevant upper-limb tasks in an immersive virtual environment. During task execution, we recorded their hand movements simultaneously by means of the Oculus Quest’s and a marker-based motion capture system. Our results showed that the markerless estimates of the hand position and peak velocity provided by the Oculus Quest were in very close agreement with those provided by a marker-based commercial system with their regression line having a slope close to 1 (maximum distance: mean slope = 0.94 ± 0.1; peak velocity: mean slope = 1.06 ± 0.12). Furthermore, the Oculus Quest had virtually the same sensitivity as that of a commercial system in distinguishing healthy from pathological kinematic measures. The Oculus Quest was as accurate as a commercial marker-based system in measuring clinically meaningful upper-limb kinematic parameters in stroke patients.
2023
Casile, A.; Fregna, G.; Boarini, V.; Paoluzzi, C.; Manfredini, F.; Lamberti, N.; Baroni, A.; Straudi, S.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Casile_Sensors_2023.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Full text editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.82 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.82 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
preprints202307.1645.v1.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Pre-print
Tipologia: Pre-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 950.84 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
950.84 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in SFERA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2525770
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact