Importance: Among younger adults, the association between Black race and postdischarge readmission after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is insufficiently described. Objectives: To examine whether racial differences exist in all-cause 1-year hospital readmission among younger adults hospitalized for AMI and whether that difference retains significance after adjustment for cardiac factors and social determinants of health (SDOHs). Design, setting, and participants: The VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients) study was an observational cohort study of younger adults (aged 18-55 years) hospitalized for AMI with a 2:1 female-to-male ratio across 103 US hospitals from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from August 1 to December 31, 2021. Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was all-cause readmission, defined as any hospital or observation stay greater than 24 hours within 1 year of discharge, identified through medical record abstraction and clinician adjudication. Logistic regression with sequential adjustment evaluated racial differences and potential moderation by sex and SDOHs. The Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition quantified how much of any racial difference was explained and not explained by covariates. Results: This study included 2822 participants (median [IQR] age, 48 [44-52] years; 1910 [67.7%] female; 2289 [81.1%] White and 533 [18.9%] Black; 868 [30.8%] readmitted). Black individuals had a higher rate of readmission than White individuals (210 [39.4%] vs 658 [28.8%], P < .001), particularly Black women (179 of 425 [42.1%]). After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, cardiac factors, and SDOHs, the odds of readmission were 34% higher among Black individuals (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06-1.68). The association between Black race and 1-year readmission was positively moderated by unemployment (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09- 2.59; P for interaction = .02) and fewer number of working hours per week (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.02; P for interaction = .01) but not by sex. Decomposition indicates that 79% of the racial difference in risk of readmission went unexplained by the included covariates. Conclusions and relevance: In this multicenter study of younger adults hospitalized for AMI, Black individuals were more often readmitted in the year following discharge than White individuals. Although interventions to address SDOHs and employment may help decrease racial differences in 1-year readmission, more study is needed on the 79% of the racial difference not explained by the included covariates.

Association of Sociodemographic Characteristics With 1-Year Hospital Readmission Among Adults Aged 18 to 55 Years With Acute Myocardial Infarction

Raparelli, Valeria;
2023

Abstract

Importance: Among younger adults, the association between Black race and postdischarge readmission after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is insufficiently described. Objectives: To examine whether racial differences exist in all-cause 1-year hospital readmission among younger adults hospitalized for AMI and whether that difference retains significance after adjustment for cardiac factors and social determinants of health (SDOHs). Design, setting, and participants: The VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients) study was an observational cohort study of younger adults (aged 18-55 years) hospitalized for AMI with a 2:1 female-to-male ratio across 103 US hospitals from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from August 1 to December 31, 2021. Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was all-cause readmission, defined as any hospital or observation stay greater than 24 hours within 1 year of discharge, identified through medical record abstraction and clinician adjudication. Logistic regression with sequential adjustment evaluated racial differences and potential moderation by sex and SDOHs. The Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition quantified how much of any racial difference was explained and not explained by covariates. Results: This study included 2822 participants (median [IQR] age, 48 [44-52] years; 1910 [67.7%] female; 2289 [81.1%] White and 533 [18.9%] Black; 868 [30.8%] readmitted). Black individuals had a higher rate of readmission than White individuals (210 [39.4%] vs 658 [28.8%], P < .001), particularly Black women (179 of 425 [42.1%]). After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, cardiac factors, and SDOHs, the odds of readmission were 34% higher among Black individuals (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06-1.68). The association between Black race and 1-year readmission was positively moderated by unemployment (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09- 2.59; P for interaction = .02) and fewer number of working hours per week (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.02; P for interaction = .01) but not by sex. Decomposition indicates that 79% of the racial difference in risk of readmission went unexplained by the included covariates. Conclusions and relevance: In this multicenter study of younger adults hospitalized for AMI, Black individuals were more often readmitted in the year following discharge than White individuals. Although interventions to address SDOHs and employment may help decrease racial differences in 1-year readmission, more study is needed on the 79% of the racial difference not explained by the included covariates.
2023
Okafor, Chinenye M; Zhu, Cenjing; Raparelli, Valeria; Murphy, Terrence E; Arakaki, Andrew; D'Onofrio, Gail; Tsang, Sui W; Smith, Marcella Nunez; Lichtman, Judith H; Spertus, John A; Pilote, Louise; Dreyer, Rachel P
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in SFERA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2504251
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact