Poorly soluble drugs must be appropriately formulated for clinical use to increase the solubility, dissolution rate, and permeation across the intestinal epithelium. Polymeric and lipid nanocarriers have been successfully investigated for this aim, and their physicochemical properties, and in particular, the surface chemistry, significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of the drugs after oral administration. In the present study, PLGA nanoparticles (SS13NP) and solid lipid nanoparticles (SS13SLN) loaded with SS13, a BCS IV model drug, were prepared. SS13 bioavailability following the oral administration of SS13 (free drug), SS13NP, or SS13SLN was compared. SS13NP had a suitable size for oral administration (less than 300 nm), a spherical shape and negative zeta potential, similarly to SS13SLN. On the contrary, SS13NP showed higher physical stability but lower encapsulation efficiency (54.31 +/- 6.66%) than SS13SLN (100.00 +/- 3.11%). When orally administered (0.6 mg of drug), SS13NP showed higher drug AUC values with respect to SS13SLN (227 +/- 14 versus 147 +/- 8 mu g/mL min), with higher C-max (2.47 +/- 0.14 mu g/mL versus 1.30 +/- 0.15 mu g/mL) reached in a shorter time (20 min versus 60 min). Both formulations induced, therefore, the oral bioavailability of SS13 (12.67 +/- 1.43% and 4.38 +/- 0.39% for SS13NP and SS12SLN, respectively) differently from the free drug. These in vivo results confirm that the chemical composition of nanoparticles significantly affects the in vivo fate of a BCS IV drug. Moreover, PLGA nanoparticles appear more efficient and rapid than SLN in allowing drug absorption and transport to systemic circulation.

Improving in vivo oral bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug: a case study on polymeric versus lipid nanoparticles

Ferraro, Luca;Dalpiaz, Alessandro
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Poorly soluble drugs must be appropriately formulated for clinical use to increase the solubility, dissolution rate, and permeation across the intestinal epithelium. Polymeric and lipid nanocarriers have been successfully investigated for this aim, and their physicochemical properties, and in particular, the surface chemistry, significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of the drugs after oral administration. In the present study, PLGA nanoparticles (SS13NP) and solid lipid nanoparticles (SS13SLN) loaded with SS13, a BCS IV model drug, were prepared. SS13 bioavailability following the oral administration of SS13 (free drug), SS13NP, or SS13SLN was compared. SS13NP had a suitable size for oral administration (less than 300 nm), a spherical shape and negative zeta potential, similarly to SS13SLN. On the contrary, SS13NP showed higher physical stability but lower encapsulation efficiency (54.31 +/- 6.66%) than SS13SLN (100.00 +/- 3.11%). When orally administered (0.6 mg of drug), SS13NP showed higher drug AUC values with respect to SS13SLN (227 +/- 14 versus 147 +/- 8 mu g/mL min), with higher C-max (2.47 +/- 0.14 mu g/mL versus 1.30 +/- 0.15 mu g/mL) reached in a shorter time (20 min versus 60 min). Both formulations induced, therefore, the oral bioavailability of SS13 (12.67 +/- 1.43% and 4.38 +/- 0.39% for SS13NP and SS12SLN, respectively) differently from the free drug. These in vivo results confirm that the chemical composition of nanoparticles significantly affects the in vivo fate of a BCS IV drug. Moreover, PLGA nanoparticles appear more efficient and rapid than SLN in allowing drug absorption and transport to systemic circulation.
2023
Rassu, Giovanna; Obinu, Antonella; Serri, Carla; Piras, Sandra; Carta, Antonio; Ferraro, Luca; Gavini, Elisabetta; Giunchedi, Paolo; Dalpiaz, Alessandro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2500971
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