Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of molecules produced, non-enzymatically, from the interaction between reducing sugars and the free amino groups of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. AGEs are formed as a normal consequence of metabolism but can also be absorbed from the diet. They have been widely implicated in the complications of diabetes affecting cardiovascular health, the nervous system, eyes, and kidneys. Increased levels of AGEs are also detrimental to metabolic health and may contribute to the metabolic abnormalities induced by the Western diet, which is high in processed foods and represents a significant source of AGEs. While increased AGE levels are a consequence of diabetic hyperglycaemia, AGEs themselves activate signaling pathways, which compromise insulin signaling and pancreatic beta-cell function, thus, contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Furthermore, AGEs may also contribute to the obesogenic effects of the Western diet by promoting hypothalamic inflammation and disrupting the central control of energy balance. Here, the role of dietary AGEs in metabolic dysfunction is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms underpinning their detrimental role in insulin resistance, pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, hypothalamic control of energy balance, and the pathogenesis of T2DM and obesity.

The Role of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products in Metabolic Dysfunction

Sergi, Domenico
Primo
;
2021

Abstract

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of molecules produced, non-enzymatically, from the interaction between reducing sugars and the free amino groups of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. AGEs are formed as a normal consequence of metabolism but can also be absorbed from the diet. They have been widely implicated in the complications of diabetes affecting cardiovascular health, the nervous system, eyes, and kidneys. Increased levels of AGEs are also detrimental to metabolic health and may contribute to the metabolic abnormalities induced by the Western diet, which is high in processed foods and represents a significant source of AGEs. While increased AGE levels are a consequence of diabetic hyperglycaemia, AGEs themselves activate signaling pathways, which compromise insulin signaling and pancreatic beta-cell function, thus, contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Furthermore, AGEs may also contribute to the obesogenic effects of the Western diet by promoting hypothalamic inflammation and disrupting the central control of energy balance. Here, the role of dietary AGEs in metabolic dysfunction is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms underpinning their detrimental role in insulin resistance, pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, hypothalamic control of energy balance, and the pathogenesis of T2DM and obesity.
2021
Sergi, Domenico; Boulestin, Hakim; Campbell, Fiona M; Williams, Lynda M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2459657
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