PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. RESULTS: The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P <.05), and had a shorter ICU stay (P <.01). Group C patients were more seriously ill according to SAPS II, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of stay in ICU and in hospital (P <.001). The incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). CONCLUSIONS: The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males.

Analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care

CAPUZZO, Maurizia
Primo
;
GRASSI, Luigi;GRITTI, Gaetano
Penultimo
;
ALVISI, Raffaele
Ultimo
2001

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. RESULTS: The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P <.05), and had a shorter ICU stay (P <.01). Group C patients were more seriously ill according to SAPS II, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of stay in ICU and in hospital (P <.001). The incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). CONCLUSIONS: The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males.
2001
Capuzzo, Maurizia; Pinamonti, A; Cingolani, E; Grassi, Luigi; Bianconi, Margherita; Contu, P; Gritti, Gaetano; Alvisi, Raffaele
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1203908
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